Morning Pages: The Lazy Writer’s Friend

Morning Pages: The Lazy Writer’s Friend

I’m not much of a self-helpy type of person. As a student of critical thinking and A.J. Ayer’s verification principle, I don’t like meaningless sentences, and as a steadfast hater of routines I have arrogantly rejected anything approaching discipline in my adult life. Hence why I realised last year that I was really wasn’t writing much and actually wasn’t getting anywhere and didn’t even have a few short stories that didn’t completely suck.

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The Language of Liars: David Cameron and the “7-Day NHS”

The Language of Liars: David Cameron and the “7-Day NHS”

Every time David Cameron says the phrase “7-day NHS”, remember that this isn’t just a harmless piece of rhetoric, nor a frivolous fallacy, nor a mere slap in the face of everyone who works for the health service and mans the battle stations on weekends, evenings, holidays and whenever else they’re needed. It’s all of these things and more.

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CuentaCuentos: Explaining Adventures and My Top Ten Tips for Storytelling

CuentaCuentos: Explaining Adventures and My Top Ten Tips for Storytelling

Last week, I was thrilled to be a part of Panama City’s first bilingual storytelling event, CuentaCuentos. Modelled on live storytelling nights like the Moth, this event featured true stories told live by writers, performers, and in fact anyone who wanted to stand behind a mic in front of a room full of strangers and open up to them. Who would do such a thing? Well, me.

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A Love Letter to the Language of Bowie

A Love Letter to the Language of Bowie

I’m not usually one for outpourings of collective grief on social media. It usually feels cold, impersonal and insincere, as if the writer simply feels the need to throw their voice into the ring for fear of coming across as unfeeling or being forgotten altogether.

The unexpected death of David Bowie yesterday provoked an avalanche of social media mourning the likes of which I’d never seen before. We couldn’t help ourselves. It was endless.

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2015 in 100 Books - OR how I finally committed to something and finished it for once

2015 in 100 Books - OR how I finally committed to something and finished it for once

I have never been very good at finishing things. I’m a serial project starter and tend to get very enthusiastic about new things; less so the continual slog of getting to the end of anything at all (apart from any one of my ill-planned cooking projects, but that’s because they all end in eating). At the start of 2015, I decided that this inability to complete things was getting out of hand and standing in the way of my personal, social and career development (it was). So I set myself a reading goal.

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Tube Strikes, Workers’ Rights and the Race to the Bottom

Tube Strikes, Workers’ Rights and the Race to the Bottom

I don’t live in London. I work from home. I am not a Tube driver, nor do I know any. I don’t work for Uber, drive a black cab, or have a business that is in any way affected by people not being able to cross London today. You might say that I have absolutely no horse in the race when it comes to the current Tube strikes.

But I do. We all do.

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Review: A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing by Eimear McBride

Review: A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing by Eimear McBride

It’s an absolute travesty that this book took almost a decade to get published, and the very fact raises some uncomfortable questions: Is contemporary British literature so staid that a work of striking contrast isn’t worth taking a risk on? Are subversive female writers destined to be shunned while their male counterparts are embraced?

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